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BOOKS OF THE WEEK - 23rd SEPTEMBER 2016

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Himalaya:Adventures, Meditations, Life by - Ruskin Bond & Namita Gokhale
About the Book :
For some, the Himalaya is a frontier against which to test themselves. Others find refuge and tranquility in the mountains, a place where they can seek their selves, perhaps even God. And over millennia, the mountains have cradled civilization itself and nurtured teeming, irrepressible life. With over fifty essays, this comprehensive volume brings together a dazzling range of voices—among others, Fa-Hsien, Pundit Nain Singh, Heinrich Harrer, Fanny Parkes, Dharamvir Bharati, Arundhathi Subramaniam, Rahul Sankrityayan, Amitav Ghosh, Jawaharlal Nehru, Frank Smythe, Paul Brunton, Edmund Hillary, Mark Twain, Sarat Chandra Das, Dom Moraes, Manjushree Thapa—and the two editors themselves—in an unparalleled panorama. Here you will find stories of great ascents and descents; The madness of war on the ‘world’s highest battlefield’; Tales of exploratory derring-do in Tibet and elsewhere; A drunken jaunt i…

BOOKS OF THE WEEK - 09Th September 2016

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This Brave New World by - Anja Manuel
About the Book : The shift of world power from U.S. and Europe to China and India is evident. From a front row seat Manuel demonstrates why India will be the most important country to shape the Asian and the world future. India, she argues, has the assets and structure to grow democratically to full strength. It has the position and population to perfectly balance the Chinese hegemony and to partner with the U.S. Often in company with Condoleezza Rice, Manuel takes the reader along on her business trips as she meets leaders and counts the assets and deficiencies of the two giant countries. India has a youthful, English-speaking population and democratic traditions but it is inefficient, misogynist and often bribery ridden. China has an aging population, no tradition of citizen rule, an ideological central government and is ruthlessly expansionist. India’s democratic sys-tem slows it down; China’s centralized authority races it erratically. Balancing …